Anonymous said: Cat meows at his own stand

cat-meowing-at-things:

pzkpfwcrusader:

I miss this show, how does one force the universe to comply with TRUE LOVE?

pzkpfwcrusader:

I miss this show, how does one force the universe to comply with TRUE LOVE?

(via executiveotaku)

humansofnewyork:

"Whenever my parents got mad, my sisters and I would climb into the branches of a tree behind our house. We’d play games up there and weave the leaves into our hair. Now whenever I have a bad customer or I’m getting yelled at by the boss, I try to imagine that tree."
(Ho Chi Minh City / Saigon, Vietnam)

humansofnewyork:

"Whenever my parents got mad, my sisters and I would climb into the branches of a tree behind our house. We’d play games up there and weave the leaves into our hair. Now whenever I have a bad customer or I’m getting yelled at by the boss, I try to imagine that tree."

(Ho Chi Minh City / Saigon, Vietnam)

(Source: clfz, via unspoken-promise)

humansofnewyork:

"Our daughter was five months old when I got a scholarship to Johns Hopkins. My wife came with me to Baltimore so that our family could stay together. I will always be thankful for that sacrifice, because I know it was the toughest three years of her life. She didn’t speak a word of English. We lived in a tiny studio— so tiny that many times I did my studying in the bathroom. In Vietnam, she had a job where she was getting phone calls all day long. But in America, the phone never rang. She wasn’t allowed to work because of visa requirements. Vietnamese holidays were regular days in America, so I’d be in class during New Year and we could never be together. Sometimes when I’d come home from school during wintertime, she’d look at me with tears in her eyes and say: ‘Tuan, I want to go home.’ But she still stayed with me. When I finally got my degree, many of my friends asked if I’d look for a job in the US. But I wouldn’t do that to her. She had done enough for me. So I said: ‘We are going home immediately.’ And as soon as we got back to Vietnam, she was like a fish back in the pond."
(Hanoi, Vietnam)

humansofnewyork:

"Our daughter was five months old when I got a scholarship to Johns Hopkins. My wife came with me to Baltimore so that our family could stay together. I will always be thankful for that sacrifice, because I know it was the toughest three years of her life. She didn’t speak a word of English. We lived in a tiny studio— so tiny that many times I did my studying in the bathroom. In Vietnam, she had a job where she was getting phone calls all day long. But in America, the phone never rang. She wasn’t allowed to work because of visa requirements. Vietnamese holidays were regular days in America, so I’d be in class during New Year and we could never be together. Sometimes when I’d come home from school during wintertime, she’d look at me with tears in her eyes and say: ‘Tuan, I want to go home.’ But she still stayed with me. When I finally got my degree, many of my friends asked if I’d look for a job in the US. But I wouldn’t do that to her. She had done enough for me. So I said: ‘We are going home immediately.’ And as soon as we got back to Vietnam, she was like a fish back in the pond."

(Hanoi, Vietnam)

humansofnewyork:

"The American jets were called Phantoms, because they appeared out of nowhere, and by the time you saw the plane, the rockets were already heading toward you. My friend and I were doing maintenance on the machinery when our factory was bombed. We heard the plane coming and tried to run toward the coal vault, but before we got there a missile tore him in half." 
(Hanoi, Vietnam)

humansofnewyork:

"The American jets were called Phantoms, because they appeared out of nowhere, and by the time you saw the plane, the rockets were already heading toward you. My friend and I were doing maintenance on the machinery when our factory was bombed. We heard the plane coming and tried to run toward the coal vault, but before we got there a missile tore him in half." 

(Hanoi, Vietnam)

valhallabarman:

So, we iterate a huge fucking lot it seems.

Which is good! this is the evolution of the user interface, last one is how the full-release currently looks, sporting new stuff like:

An interactive background: Have you played Hearthstone? is something like that, in the sense that you can click the objects and they will have cute reactions.

A streamlined mixer: You no longer have to switch between modes, since the slots are available all the time, and when you go over ten ingredients it automatically switches to “big” mode, ain’t that cool?

We also made Dorothy’s sprite a tad more cute. Tried to re-design her but a lot of her charm was lost, so we simply cleaned up the original prototype sprite and called it a day, it was the best decision… trust me.

For now, the plan is to see if we can replace the shaker for a nicer one, as well as better looking drinks… among other suprises.

What do you think of the new look?

Tags: Cool Sauce

(Source: sasukeapologist, via coalgirls)

(Source: coalgirls)